This may look like an ordinary smoking pipe – but it was actually a deadly weapon used by British spies in WW2

It has a lethal dagger stashed inside, while a pencil, also up for auction tomorrow, has a thin blade in place of lead to aid the undercover agent A treasure trove of deadly gadgets issued to British spies during the Second World War has been unearthed. Innocent-looking everyday items were converted to deadly weapons by the Special Operations Executive to use behind enemy lines. The items include a smoking pipe with a detachable mouthpiece which pulls out to reveal a lethal steel dagger. And a run-of-the-mill travel razor kit has a hidden spike blade in the case. There is also a steel dagger spike which could be concealed in clothing and brandished in life or death situations.. The ‘escape and evasion’ items were amassed by a collector of World War Two memorabilia over the years but have now emerged for auction. Other ingenious items issued to SOE agents were matchboxes with a hidden compass inside and miniature message containers which could be concealed from prying guards. One of the lots in the sale is a ‘biscuit tin’ radio transmitter which was used by an agent to receive messages behind enemy lines in occupied Belgium. Mathew Tredwin, of C&T Auctioneers of Ashford, Kent...

At some point in your electrical pursuits, you’ll need to make a connector. Maybe you’re designing

At some point in your electrical pursuits, you’ll need to make a connector. Maybe you’re designing something that will connect to another device, or maybe the spaghetti mess of wires coming out of your Raspberry Pi has become a pain to deal with. Whatever the reason, a proper connector can solve a lot of headaches in electronics projects. Your first thought might be to run to your favorite component distributor and order the connectors, terminals, and crimping tool. Unfortunately, those tools can cost thousands of dollars. Maybe you’ll just solder the connectors instead? Don’t! It makes for easily damaged connections. Fortunately, [Matt Millman] has a great guide on wire-to-board connectors. This guide will explain why you should never solder crimp terminals and then get into working with some of the most common wire-to-board connector families. For example, the Mini-PV series (which often get called “Dupont”) are one of the most ubiquitous connectors in hobbyist electronics. They’re the connector on those rainbow colored jumper wire sets, and connect perfectly to 0.1″ pin headers. The connectors and terminals are cheap, but the official HT-0095 crimp tool costs over $1500. Mos...